NJ has over 100 active COVID-19 outbreaks in nursing homes – NBC New York

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What there is to know

  • New Jersey faces more than 100 active outbreaks of COVID-19 in nursing homes across the state, according to Health Commissioner Judith Persichilli.
  • “We are seeing a continued increase in the number of outbreaks in nursing homes: 113 outbreaks active today. This is of great concern because we know that the immune system weakens with age,” Persichilli said on Monday. .
  • Currently, more than 93% of residents and 74.2% of staff at New Jersey long-term care and health facilities are vaccinated, the Garden State Health Commissioner said. It is not known if any of the vaccinees are among the positive cases.

New Jersey faces more than 100 active outbreaks of COVID-19 in nursing homes across the state, according to Health Commissioner Judith Persichilli.

“We are seeing a continued increase in the number of outbreaks in nursing homes: 113 outbreaks active today. This is of great concern because we know that the immune system weakens with age,” Persichilli said on Monday. .

President Joe Biden’s administration announced last week that it would require nursing home staff to be vaccinated against COVID-19 as a condition for those facilities to continue to receive federal Medicare and Medicaid funding. The mandate was not only to increase vaccination in the country’s war against the virus, but also as an additional measure to protect people with weakened immune systems.

Currently, more than 93% of residents and 74.2% of staff at New Jersey long-term care and health facilities are vaccinated, the Garden State Health Commissioner said. It is not known if any of the vaccinees are among the positive cases.

“Additionally, we will be working from home with leaders in the nursing home industry to develop a stimulus package for all nursing homes,” said Persichilli.

U.S. health officials on Wednesday announced plans to distribute COVID-19 booster shots to all Americans to boost their protection amid the burgeoning delta variant and signs that vaccine effectiveness is waning.

The plan, as outlined by the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other major health authorities, calls for an additional dose eight months after people receive their second injection of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine. Doses could start the week of September 20.

The first recalls would be aimed at people in high priority groups who received America’s first vaccines: residents of nursing homes, health workers and people with underlying health conditions. Health officials are likely to recommend that the booster be of the same brand of vaccine that people initially received.


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